Security Incidents – Prevention is Dead

It doesn’t take a security genius to figure out that the theory of preventing security incidents – from malware infestations and child porn cases, to bank fraud and databreaches – is a failed concept.

For years we have ignored, overlooked or rationalized the dramatic increases in both security spending and losses from cybercrime. Despite a 40 percent annual increase in information security budgets, the total of losses and costs from security incidents has increased 400 percent. This can only mean the following:

  1. We are spending our security dollars on the wrong things. If your company spends more on security hardware and software than it does on security policies, processes, measurement and analysis, it may be time to review your priorities. Security peace of mind comes from knowing exactly where your weaknesses are and the knowledge that you’ve effectively strengthened them. Ask your security hardware vendor to guarantee their product’s effectiveness – they’ll respond only with a smile. You may also be interested to know that the US Military spends more on analysts and communications than it does on guns and artillery.
  2. We are implementing the wrong things incorrectly. Whether it’s the use of default passwords on firewalls or misapplied IDS and SIEM rules, commonplace security hardware and software is falling down on the job. But it’s not doing it alone. Just like guns don’t kill people, firewalls don’t ALLOW ALL. Without a thorough, consistent Certification and Accreditation process, companies will continue to put hardware and software on the wire that does little to protect them, all while introducing new vulnerabilities.
  3. The wrong things, once implemented incorrectly, are not being assessed or measured for incorrectness. It is a well-known statistic that a significant majority of security breaches are made possible by the lack of effective patching of systems and applications, where patches have been available for six or more months. While poor configurations are released into the wild, effective assessments can reduce those risks. How well is your security infrastructure protecting your business? If you can’t answer this question quantitatively, it’s time to implement a system of regular assessment and measurement.

One of the most profound findings from 2011’s Verizon Business Data Breach Investigations Report (see image) was that 86 percent of databreaches were discovered not by the afflicted parties, but rather by the afflicted party’s customers, partners or business associates. This staggering number demonstrates that despite all security efforts, companies are doing an inadequate job of prevention (and detection, in this case).

The time has come to shift our efforts to detection and correction, or at least institute a better balance across these domains. Consider your bank, and what they consider their most valuable security controls. Rarely do you find armed guards at banks today, and most of them prefer glass doors. Inside, however, you’ll find cameras, panic buttons and dye canisters at every teller station. You can’t stop bank robbers, but you can stop bank robberies.

With all of the press around security incidents these days, blogs like this feel like beating a dead horse. Unfortunately, if this preaching weren’t falling on deaf ears the statistics would be headed in the other direction. So grab your conscience, some duct tape and a bottle of water, there’s work to do.

And grab a shovel, we need help digging this grave.

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About regharnish

CEO of GreyCastle Security

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