Avoiding Cyber 9/11

Like most people, I remember September 11, 2001 like it was yesterday.

It was a bright and beautiful afternoon as we drove North along the 3 headed back to Zürich, following a 10-day visit to Innsbruck, Venice, Milan and a number of other quaint countryside villages. I was visiting a good friend who had recently moved to Switzerland, and we were taking some time to enjoy Europe’s best sites. The Alps are breathtaking, no matter what time of year it is.

As we entered the city center and got closer to Andre’s apartment, we could feel the end of our trip growing closer. I was scheduled to fly out the following morning and Andre was headed back to work. As we mentally switched gears, we also switched radio stations, changing from the throbbing dance music that kept us hammering on the Autobahns to a local news broadcast. It was in German, so I only caught every fifth word.

I will never forget the look on Andre’s face.

“An airplane crashed in to the World Trade Center”, he said in his thick Dutch accent.

Simultaneously piecing together in my mind what I just heard and sorting through the possibilities of mis-translation, I immediately began rationalizing what might have happened. Once I gathered my thoughts I explained to Andre that this had happened before, and that the buildings are so big that a small Cessna wouldn’t cause much damage.

For a while I lived in New York City just three blocks South of the World Trade Center. I lived in a large apartment on the 26th floor with a balcony that overlooked the towers. I walked through World Trade South nearly every day. My apartment didn’t need paintings or artwork, I had the New York City skyline.

“It wasn’t a Cessna, it was a jumbo jet.”

For Americans, everything changed on 9/11. The inconceivable events that transpired on that day shifted everything we knew in a different direction. Finances, politics, healthcare, education, relationships – everything we knew suddenly took on a different perspective. A different priority. But none of these things changed more than our position on security.

The 9/11 Commission spent nearly three years collecting, analyzing and documenting the 585 pages of data resulting from that day and the years leading up to those horrific events. In the end, the Commission determined that there was a single condition that made the events of that day possible.

We didn’t think it could happen to us.

As simple and sad as that seems, there’s another chapter to this story. We face a much greater threat today, and we find ourselves repeating history. The infrastructure that our very existence depends on is in jeopardy, and we have put our heads in the proverbial “9/11 sand”. An exploitation or compromise of our power, water or financial networks could result in a complete collapse of society and death tolls that bin Laden himself could not imagine.

This is not science fiction. Thanks to Hurricane Irene, we have seen very recently what power and water loss of only a few days can do to a community. Now imagine this on a global scale.

By the year 2020, there will be 50 billion devices connected to the Internet. There will be tens if not hundreds of thousands of hackers and organized cybercriminals. If it took the United States ten years to track down one man moving from cave to cave, how long will it take us to dismantle an organized network of 100,000 computer hackers?

On this, the ten-year anniversary of the worst security incident in United States history, I urge you to ask yourself the following question:

What are we doing to avoid Cyber 9/11?

 

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About regharnish

CEO of GreyCastle Security

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